Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN2 48
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: well, i mean there would be downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of the domestic accounts. so it would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduced federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of five, 10%. so there would be downsizing of the services provided
will call the roll. quorum call: is en mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. ms. cantwell: i ask the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. cantwell: i rise to say what as important day it is for the u.s. coast guard. our communities who benefit from those services, the men and women who answer the call to serve. the reason i say that is because we have passed a bill that gives 40,000 active-duty coast guard members the support they need. it is a worthy tribute to a force of men and women that in 2000 alone helped us save over 3,800 lives across the u.s., confiscated over 166,000 pounds of cocaine and secured over 472 vessels before they arrived at our ports. this legislation will give the coast guard the funds that it needs to upgrade equipment and purchase the right vessels for carrying out every mission that they need. this kind of work exemplifies the heroes like chief petty officer terrell horn of california. officer horn died in the line of duty last week while tracing drug smugglers off the coast of california. our tho
here in washington to justify taking more away from them. secondly, there is a tendency on the other side to view everything as a zero-sum game. in their mind, if someone has more, it means someone else will have less. so i'd like to quote ronald reagan as the best example of this attitude in washington. too many people in washington -- quote -- "can't see a fat man standing beside a thin one without coming to the conclusion that the fat man got that way by taking advantage of the thin one," end of reagan quote. i believe this is what is driving the animas against the so-called wealthy on the other side. they are under the impression the wealthy got rich at the expense of someone less fortunate. the problem with this view is that in a free economy, goods and services are transferred through voluntary exchanges. both parties are better off as a result of this exchange. otherwise it wouldn't occur. moreover, wealth is not static. it can be both created as well as destroyed. at worst, the government is a destroyer of wealth. at best, the government is a redistribute tor of wealth. it is
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
questions, what about the top priority in washington and then the top priorities for you. washington, d.c. this ranking. debt and deficit followed by social security, good paying jobs, education, the top four as you go down on a scale of one to 10. so look at this as sort of a statutory if you will, the number one ranks as number one. easy deficit and debt interest to enough, 18-20. also those over 50, independents, republicans and by white households. if you look at the number ones on education, cost and outcomes of that, they are number one for democrats, americans and hispanics. found in our research, support particularly among the minority community, access to securing their own economic security. we've been asked that same question about not washington, but you. women ask it about you, what's most important it's about social security and medicare number one, followed by being able to comfortably retire, number two. cost of health care, number three. price of energy, energy being gasoline, natural gas and home heating fuels. and then education follows that. so when you move away fro
carried that message straight to washington. i remember scott telling me in our very first meeting that i couldn't count on his vote. that i'd have to earn it. i told him could do whatever he pleased and while he hasn't been here long, he certainly made his mark. i've seen a lot of politicians in my day, but few if any have been as talented as scott brown. he is a unique talent. and i have no doubt we'll see him back in washington someday in the not-too-distant future. the truth is scott's victory wasn't the first time he'd done what others thought impossible. as a young man, he knew poverty first hand, and a broken home. and even took to shoplifting to feed himself and his sister. yet scott overcame these early challenges and as is often the case, he owes a lot of it to an adult who saw his potential early on. in scott's case, that adult was judge samuel zall. when scott showed up in his chambers one day, the judge saw a troubled but decent young man who needed a friendly nudge. we had a long talk about the talent i thought he had, and i didn't want to see him squander it, judge zall lat
officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., december 13, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks the senate will be in a period of morning business until 11:30 this morning. republicans will control the first 30 minutes, majority controlling the second 30 minutes. following morning business we'll resume consideration of s. 3637. the filing deadline for second-degree amendments to that legislation is 10:30 today. at noon there will be up to two roll call votes, first on the motion to waive the budget act if a point of order is raised. if the motion is successful there will be a second roll call vote on the motion to invoke cloture on the bill. i'm confident there will be additional votes this afternoon on judici
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
on the line every day in distant lands have to worry about whether those who in washington can effectively support them. we are down to the wire now. in these next few days, congress needs to make the right decision and to avoid the fiscal disaster that awaits us. my hope is that they will do the right thing and that we will achieve a bipartisan consensus on deficit reduction and the trajectory of defense spending in the future. otherwise, we will weaken this nation in the minds of our allies, our partners, and our potential adversaries, and undermined the work as a sacrifices that our troops are making every single day. it's easy to get cynical and frustrated in this town. and after 40 years, i know my level of cynicism and frustration. but my confidence and my hope for the future is restored every time i have the opportunity to visit with our troops on the front lines, as i did last week. in them, i see the spirit of public service that has kept this country strong for more than two centuries and which has helped us to overcome every period of crisis and adversity in our history. that sp
is history. george washington had his family inoculated. back in the time of the revolutionary war, more people died from communicable disease than died from actual bullets. this it was true in most wars up until this century. so i think it takes bold vision, and i think sandy greenberg will help to move this along with his prize. i love the idea of incentives. we're a country built on incentives. i don't think any scientist is going to jump forward and say i'm doing it only for the prize. prizes don't hurt. we should acknowledge that these scientists who can come forward and may come forward with a great cure should be rewarded for that. and so i would just like to thank sandy greenberg and his family for setting up this prize, and i hope that out of this some great good will come for those who have gone blind in prevention. mr. coons: thank you, senator paul. i, like you, am confident that some great good will come out of this, out of this bold vision, out of this clear initiative. as we look forward at the health care debates that have raged throughout this chamber and this country in
rice in the blogosphere over the last couple of weeks over issues related to the congo. the washington shark cage has been fully activated, and because some people see blood in the water, but knowing johnny and susan and working with them for over the past 16 years i can tell you from personal expense they worked tirelessly for peace in the great lakes. reason the people, however, can disagree over tactics in over strategy. and it is in that spirit that it deliver my testimony today. i'm going to focus my remarks on issues related to the congolese peace process. throughout the latest of congolese congregation and previous conflict there, the root causes of war have not been addressed. leaving these peace processes, and -- to focus on flimsy power-sharing deals and arrangements that have undermined the sovereignty of the congolese state, professionalism and neutrality of the forces. this in turn has left the civil population of eastern congo subjected to globally unparalleled violence and impoverished youth. another unrepresentative agreement between powerful interest within the biggest
about, it was not a priority for washington. special mission was not a priority for washington when it came to security related requests. especially those related to staffing. i want to understand who washington is. and in that frame of mind i think the secretary brings out a number of question. i know secretary clinton visited libya in october 20 of them. did the security situation come up with during her visit there, whether it was a country thing or in her interaction with the libyans? >> senator, i'm sure in general terms that it did. i wasn't on the trips i don't know specifically. i can speak to my own experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them.
time. you can listen to c-span radio in the washington/baltimore area at 90.1 area, on xm channel 119 or online at c-span radio.org. >> supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg spoke in the fall at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase
of the james stewart goes to washington. if we're going have filibuster, i think we should have those rules in place, what we do need do is change it so that mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it doesn't just run time against the senate and go to senate forum calls for indefinitely periods of time while waiting for the time frame to go so you can the vote. it doesn't make any sense to do that. if somebody feels strongly enough they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why or -- i think it will be self-sort of self-enforcing that people will be less likely to file a filibuster as often as they have been through the record. the number of filibusters filed over the last two or three or four years super creeds anything in the past. if they can't work together, can't get anything done, and look one of the -- one of my staffers wants the senate to be docked pay for quorum calls. it's points well made. >> c-span2 viewers would appreciate that. >> absolutely. >> any other senate rules or proceedings that you think need re
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
bureaucracy in washington that this report has clearly revealed. why for a civil have made toward the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel an
explicit about this here in washington as we were engaged with congress and probably to that year, those proposals included -- we have talked about capping deductions. >> he did and he was certainly reporting this. it is something that is for the top 2%. something he had been explicit about for more than a year now since september 2011. >> [inaudible question] >> i would say one of the reasons is that we need to continue to grow the economy. and he has always believed that deficit reduction is our goal on the side. we need to achieve that in a way that does throw this backward and the reason that people are so concerned about the fiscal cliff prospect is the commendation of tax increases and spending cuts across the board and how they would have negative impacts. so we need to do it in a smart way. even as we find savings, we need to make targeted investments and we need to do things that help our economy and the long-term. >> [inaudible question] >> it is not specifically designed for that. it is the president's broader approach this. significant savings need to be where we can get them
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
press club here in washington today. he will talk about election shun reform. c-span will have it live beginning at 1:00 eastern. at 7:00 eastern c-span will be live with a discussion on skilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is talking about a bill that will allow more highly killed immigrants into the united states. it will be hosted by the university of virginia. >>> we've had explosions of knowledge in medicine but we've not coordinated care. all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating and you got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all, i mean on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? and of course now we've got the institute of medicine report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care, when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures? this is something i think which is for the first time, really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
with oklahoma republican tom cole from this morning's washington journal. >> host: we want to welcome back to the table congressman tom cole, republican of oklahoma. let's begin with the news. house speaker john boehner sent a proposal to the white house yesterday, counterbid as it is being called. what do you think? >> guest: i think it is a great opening start. actually it makes very tangible with the speaker committed to after the election which is we are going to put it on the table so that question is settled and we are not talking about how much and what way, but that is an enormous step forward honestly by the republicans or concessions. not something we want to do but something we recognize we have to do to get there. so i think the speaker's proposal directs us to words what some of the problems are which are entitlement spending. that is what is driving the debt and we can't pussyfoot around it. we can't solve it with just revenue, you have to have reform. while we like the ryan budget and i think i would be the appropriate way to go, they picked up elements of some of the propos
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
-income families look at washington and don't see enough progress on jobs, frankly, and folks coming together. i think they will. until they see that, they have a sense there is something substantial that's decided that affects their lives, they're going to be very uncertain. i hear this from taxpayers, i also hear a lot about uncertainty from small business owners. and at the same time we have something we can do about it. or i should say the house has something they can do it about it right now. we passed in the senate this summer in july, i guess it was july 24, a tax cut for middle-class families, meaning we would continue the tax rates for those families. that kind of certainty is badly needed right now. so one of the best things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before
that's what we should call the united states congress. more than 26,000 fans crammed into washington grizzly stadium to watch the annual battle on the gridiron. during the game, mostly during halftime when there's a break in the action, fans come up to me and say, hi, max, good to see. we start talking about football. but often turned to washington, especially the fiscal crisis. not once did someone say, don't do this, don't raise my taxes, don't count my favorite program. not once did i receive a parochial treaty request. my montana bosses told me again and again, max, just get it done. you guys need to work together. just get it done. i was really almost stunned at the unity and the intensity with which people spoke to me, get it done. now, these folks didn't ask for stalemates. they didn't ask for influx of billy. they didn't ask for our leaders to dig in over ideological things. they are pragmatic. american people want congress and the president to work together. they want us to tackle these challenges. keeping with the football theme, i want to show the words of vince lombardi,
in washington, d.c.. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is pete peterson. i would have given you a review of the foundation and why we are supporting the project you are here about today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trend, and the vast unfunded pharmacists that we've made, i decided that our projected long-term, and i emphasize long-term debt or not only on sanibel liguori primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house and which i serve, the chairman of the council of economic advisers used to say if something is unsustainable he said it tends to stop for he said if you don't like that, if your horse dies i suggest you dismount. well i think we have been he'd be eating as the we can write this more or less indefinitely. in lu of a quiet, i decided to set up and non-partisan foundation whose principal mission would be to increase awareness of the long term debt and various solutions and try to get something done. never in my experience have our fiscal securities, our economic securities and our national se
: washington d.c., december 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president, following leader remarks the senate will be in a period of morning business until 2:00 today. the republicans will control the first 30 minutes and the majority the final 30 minutes. the time from 11:30 till 2:00 p.m. will be for remarks by retiring senators. following morning business we'll resume consideration of the motion to proceed to s. 3637, the tag extension legislation. the filing deadline for first-degree amendments to that legislation is 1:00 p.m. today. madam president, the headline news for the last many weeks has been the fiscal cliff. in speaking with the president six months before the election, a few weeks before the election, a few days before the election and immediately after the election, he indicated that we needed to get our
. the designer of washington city there was a competition and he submitted design for a palace. americans are not having a palace. it was not particularly on inspiring. in fact in 1821 a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large nor on inspiring. but the answer the congressman dave said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> former new york times photo credit has gathered a few of her favorite white house fellows in the white house, the president's home and photographs of history. one sunday evening and 730 eastern and pacific on american history tv. >> as president obama begins his second term in office but is the most important issue he should consider for 2013? >> if you are in grade 6-12 make a short video. >> the video competition with your chance for a grand prize of $5000. 50,000 in total prices. the deadline is january. for more information go to a student cam. ..
of the world. dan, my dear friend and colleague, you will be missed in washington as much as you will be missed in hawaii. rest in peace. god bless you and your spirit. mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: i ask unanimous consent the help committee be discharged from further consideration of s. 3472 and the senate proceed to its immediate consideration. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 3472, a bill to amend the family educational rights and privacy act of 1974, to provide improvements to such act. the presiding officer: without objection. the committee is discharged. the senate will proceed to the measure. mrs. hagan: i further ask that the landrieu substitute amendment which is at the desk be agreed to, the bill as amended be read a third time and passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or debate, and that any statements relating to the measure be printed at the appropriate place in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without
associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he's responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students to seek positions in the nonprofit and government sectors and assisting students to find ways to fund their legal education to make it possible for them to pursue careers outside of traditional law firms. for most of his career, dean morrison worked for the public citizen litigation group which he co-founded with ralph nader in 1972 and directed for over 25 years. his work involved law reform litigation in various areas including open government, opening up the legal profession, suing agencies that fail to comply with the law and forcing principles of separation of powers, protecting the rights of consumers and protecting unrepresented class members in class action settlements. he's argued 20 cases in the supreme court including victories in virginia state board of pharmacy for virginia citizens' consumer council making commercia
, most detail oriented budget leader in washington. so senator conrad stands up and fires up his slide projector or overhead projector, the lights dim, and he launches into a lengthy discourse on the minutia of the federal budget and the deficit of the time. 30 minutes and more than 40 slides later, the lights come back on. i think there were maybe 20 of us left in the auditorium. everyone else having wandered outside for the cocktails. but i was enthralled by his presentation, by the clarity of his thinking, and by his dedication to getting things right for the american people. today i'm on the budget committee and i've enjoyed serving with senator conrad as my chairman. it was for this budget nerd a dream come true to have the chance to show up on time and know that this budget committee chairman was the other member of the committee who always showed up on time. and it gave us moments to reflect on the challenges we face and on the very real solutions that he's offered over these many years of service. senator conrad has earned the deserved respect of his colleagues the old-fashione
of the university of indianapolis and helping that institution establish a washington internship program. i look forward to announcing additional endeavors of service in the coming weeks. my service in the senate would not have been possible without the encouragement and the constant support of my loving wife, shar, our four sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united s
it was sort discussed in congress. the ruling is now. only washington are the words not known and appropriate not know. i think it's unequivocal that congress intended with the time frames that were put in there, the court overturned a something called the chevron hard-won our part to test. i think the will of elected branch was explicit and the court overturned the will of the elected on a very narrow ground and sent it back. >> you mentioned the one word we tried to get through, on sequencing. and i'm taking your testimony correctly, the lack thereof perhaps as far as how to cftc has handled matters, not putting words in your mouth. you want to elaborate? >> sure. first, i think the cftc probably more than any global regulator in the world has attempted to meet the 2012 deadline for derivatives reform, but in doing so they have assembled a confluence of rules but really i'll go effective at the same time in the next couple of weeks. weekend contest that, with actually provided to the market a sequencing plan, condition on certain foundational rules, such as what product definitions, that's
washington post." dr. ashton carter, deputy secretary of defense. allyson fitzgerald, a freelance journalist and the chairwoman of the speaker's committee. i'm going to speak this -- skip the speaker for a minute. adana, reporter for usa today and past president of the national press club and speakers' committee organized today's luncheon. dr. jim miller, undersecretary of the defense policy. larry moffey editing manager army magazine. john, past president of the national press club and former commander of american legion post number 20 at the national press club. joe, incoming editor-in-chief, aviation week and past chairman of the national press club board of governors. paul schenck minn, national security reporter, u.s. news and world report. [applause] just 18 months ago our guest today leon panetta presented as the cia director over the one of daring operations in the country's history. the operation spier their lead on osama bin laden secret compound in pakistan. three days ago defense secretary leon panetta landed in turkey where he signed an order that was then patriot missile battle
. most foreign-policy issues that washington has to address and any administration has to address, allies are taking account but not in the same way they were in this whole inf trust us. >> go ahead, ros. before you go, if you all have some questions, this is your moment in the sun. just raise your hand and i will try to recognize you. >> taking into account the many people who have dealt with united states and we understand this is just a subtle brush off. in the case of the allies, these were very strong leaders and they insisted on their views being taken into account and being a part of what we were doing. >> okay, please raise your hand if you have a question. >> there's a shortage of microphones. >> anyone who has a question, please raise your hand. >> thank you, on the right. >> please give your name if you would, please. >> thanks to roz ridgway who was my -- years ago. you said they wrote the history. is there any hope today that we still have big people, men or women on the scene, who can write some history because we have got a lot of problems. someone mentioned iran. there is
such great work on this measure over many months, as well as to senator cantwell of washington and other colleagues who have cosponsored this measure, including senators collins, feinstein, gillibrand, kerry, landrieu, merkley, mikulski, murray, vitter, and wyden. they are tireless animal advocates, and this bill is indeed, the amendment as well, are about ending animal fighting, which plainly and simply is a blood sport. it is something that is cruel and inhumane. it leaves animals scarred and disabled. and it is associated with many other criminal activities. people who attend animal fights are often also engaged in drug dealing, extortion, assault, a variety of criminal activities, and the enabling activity is animal fighting. and that is why this bill increases the penalties for knowingly -- knowingly -- attending an animal fight with a child and, indeed, makes it a crime to knowingly attend an animal fight. so these penalties -- stricter penalties for bringing a child knowingly and criminal penalties of up to a year imprisonment or a fine or both for knowingly attending an animal fi
in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nuclear program, the pursuit of nuclear weapons, the implications to the ad states, israel, our allies, the possi
-span.org. we'll take you live now to the national cathedral here in washington d.c. you see a picture there where a memorial service is going to be held shortly for the late hawaii senator danielle inouye. daniel inouye. president obama, vice president biden and veterans affairs secretary shinseki are kennelinged to pay tribute. -- scheduled to pay tribute. rear admiral barry black scheduled to perform the sermon. following a memorial service for members of congress, we see senator dick durbin on your screen. the senator died of respiratory complications mold, he was 88 years old. senator inouye returns home the hawaii on saturday. a public service will be held at the national memorial cemetery of the pacific on sunday before he's laid to rest in his home state. we're going to watch and listen now, live coverage on c-span2. ♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
because the federal court in washington, d.c. concluded that it violated the federal voting rights act. texas already has a voter i.d. requirement. the 2011 law reduced the list of acceptable i.t. eliminating for example the voter registration cards, birth certificates, student i.d. cards issued from state universities and in plant and identification cards with photos. although there is no logical connection between the citizenship and holding a driver's license during the night of the texas border by the law, elected officials consistently affirmed that a stay issued photo voter i.d. law was needed to prevent non-citizens from voting in the testimony in the fri case the state representatives when asked about the specific instances that she knew of of the voter fraud described one instance in which she saw a hispanic and spanish-speaking woman that needed assistance loading the representative offers this incident as an example of the voter fraud despite the fact that she also testified she has no knowledge whether it was a citizen or not only that she was hispanic. in 22 of coloradan l
discussion today. i don't know that we've come to any conclusion, but that makes us fit right into washington on this topic. so we thank you all for coming. before you leave, i want to do a shameless plug for a new timeline, video timeline that is going to be posted today on our kaiser family foundation web site. it's sort of a fun, quick way to get a little bit of history on medicare. so for those of you who are looking for a fun way to learn about the program, i think you would find it educational, and it's short and brief. and i know everybody likes that. so i want to thank ed for hosting this discussion today and thank our panelists for coming and sharing your thoughts on this perspective, and i leave it to ed for any final comments. >> only one thing. two things, actually. one is to fill out those evaluations and, second, to manifest what tricia was talking about by joining me in thanking our panel for this great discussion today. [applause] and for doing so well, we're going to free you from the obligation to come to any more alliance seminars this year. [laughter] >> happy new year. >>
the details of every troop movement in afghanistan any more than americans expected george washington to publish his strategy for the battle of york town. by the same token, american citizens recognized that their government may sometimes rely on secret intelligence collection methods in order to ensure national security, ensure public safety, and they recognize that these methods often are more effective when the details, what are really the operations and methods as we characterize them under intelligence principles, remain secret. but while americans recognize that government agencies will sometimes rely on secret sources and methods to collect intelligence information, americans expect that these agencies will at all times operate within the boundaries of publicly understood law. now, i have had the honor, mr. president, to serve on the intelligence community now for over a decade. i don't take a back seat to anyone when it comes to the importance of protecting genuine , sensitive details about the work being done in the intelligence community, particularly their sources and metho
: washington, d.c, december 5, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for up to four hours. the reason for that is we've been on the defense bill for a considerable number of days, and people haven't been able to come and express their views on a number of different issues, so we're going to extend that morning business for a longer time thank normal. following morning business, about 2:00, we'll begin consideration of h.r. 6156, the russia trade bill. we hope to complete action on this that bill today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at t
across the country that decide from places in washington and other places that because of your swing state status that they just don't like your rules. and they participate. but voting is really a culture of a state. if you want to have confidence in it, it has to come from both sides, it has to come from within. people have to believe in that process, and it's different in all of our states. and it really, there were a lot of outrageous claims that occurred during the legislative process and our elections process in ohio. but if you're talking about that balance, what are the two big charges? suppression and fraud. those are the two, those are the two charges that you hear. well, charges of voter sup legs in -- suppression if ohio, i'll give you a few of them. it said that, basically, we were preventing -- our rules prevented people from having easy access to vote. well, here's what the rules are, you decide. for the first time, every single voter in our state received an absentee ballot request mailed to their home, that was nearly seven million voters. so every voter had nearly 35
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
, with a critical eye at all could understand what our people on the ground were telling washington. we were out sourced security to a nonexistent government. we were pushing the theme of leading from behind to a fault. finally, i think it's fair to say that president bush sometimes went into strong without thinking of the consequences. i think it is fair to say that we're taking a backseat, a time of critical need for the world without thinking about the consequences. mr. president, the strategy you are employing of trying to lead from behind is allowing the mideast to blow up before our eyes. you need to engage based on reality. reality is that iraq is falling apart. if you don't do something very soon, the same thing that happened in libya is going to happen in iraq and other places throughout the world. >> thank you. i want to also ago the comments of my colleagues, senator mccain, senator graham. i appreciated the work done on the accountability review board report. there obviously was substantial work done on this, and when you to work on a bipartisan basis to implement the recommendations
. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., december 28, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable mark r. warner, a senator from the commonwealth of virginia, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: following leader remarks the senate will begin consideration of h.r. 5949, the fisa reauthorization bill. at approximately 9:45 a.m. this morning, there will be several, up to 25, roll call votes. in order to complete action on the fisa bill and on the supplemental appropriations bill. the senate will recess from 12:30 p.m. until 2:15 p.m. to allow for caucus meetings. additional votes in relation to executive nominations are possible today. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. the senate will proceed to the consideration of h.r. 5949, which the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number 510, an ac
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48